How to do Keyword Research.

If you have ever thought of driving more traffic to your website from organic search, you are sure to have heard about how important it is to select the right keywords. There are many data driven tools, such as the AdWords Keyword Planner, Keyword Discovery and Spyfu, that can help you to identify keywords, understand the potential traffic and look at the relative competition that your site is facing to rank for these keywords. This process will often leave you with a large of a list of keywords from which to select.
How to do Keyword Research
The smart marketer knows that the final selection is not just about the raw numbers. It’s about finding the language that will best describe your product or service. This language needs to match the language your potential customers are using in their search queries.

This final selection of keywords is at its heart a qualitative decision.

Consider the following:

  • Take into consideration the unique selling proposition of your products.
  • Consider the tone of voice of your website.
  • Incorporate the day-to-day language your customers use to speak about your product and services.

The subjective nature of this does not mean that you can’t put a process in place that will aid you to find the best keywords possible.

How to do Keyword Research: Five Steps

The five-step approach outlined below will allow you to separate the wheat from the chaff and come up with the best keyword mix possible.

Step 1 – Decide what each page you are optimizing hopes to accomplish

Each page of your website should have a primary purpose that it hopes to accomplish. Is it an informational page that sets up the next step in the buying cycle? Are you trying to gather a lead or close a sale? Are you setting up a comparison to a competitor’s product?

Different goals for a page will inform the language use on that page and how that language is interpreted by the search engines. Search queries have become much more natural language focused over the last five years, with many queries being stated as a question: “How do the laws about European online privacy differ from the US?”, “What is GDPR?” and “How to do set-up opt-in email lists in France?”. These queries are around the same subject. However, what the searcher is hoping to accomplish versus the page that best answers each question is different.

Step 2 – Look at your competitor’s sites that rank well to understand how they are using language

Look at your competition for one-to-one comparisons with your products, services and stages in the buying cycle.
Picture with English words related to keyword research.
Ask the following:

  • How are your top-ranking competitors using language?
  • Does it mirror the top keywords results exactly or is there modifying language around the keyword?
  • What is the actual content of the page?
  • Is it delivering on the intent of the keyword you are looking at.

Step 3 – Add modifying language to your base list of keywords

Once you have clarified your goals for the page and looked at the successful competition, take your keywords and add modifying language that reflects the desired goal of your page. In the above example, our keywords were ‘European Online Privacy Laws,” “GDPR” and “French email opt-in requirements”. While related, each keyword can have different modifiers added to it to make the content of the page more relevant. For example, the keyword “GDPR” could be modified to read “GDPR Definition”, “Understanding GDPR”, “GDPR Timeline” or “GDPR’s Impact on Websites”. (GDPR refers to the General Data Protection Regulation in the EU. If you don’t know about it yet, you should find out more.)

The modifiers are a major signal to the search engines of the intent of the page’s content (its goal). Ideally, the search engine will match the searcher’s intent as communicated in the query with your page’s content. This match between the search results and the searcher’s desires is what is going to help your page accomplish its goal.

Step 4 – Draft a title and description for each page for the keywords you are considering

Take a few minutes and plug the different keywords that you are still considering into a rough title and a description of the page’s content. Don’t worry about character length yet. You are working on getting the feel of the quality of the keyword you are using. Also, ask if it really reflect the content of the page and its ultimate communications/marketing goal? You can use the best matches later as a starting point when you are ready to polish them up and fit them into the required character lengths.

Step 5 – Select your top three to five keywords and titles that best describe the page, its goal and the customer’s next step in the buying cycle

Take your rough titles and page descriptions and compare them to each other. Find the one that resonates the most for the content and goal of the page. Show them to your colleagues and get their first impressions as to relevance and tone. Select the ones that best fit your page.

In summary, as you do your initial research using the online tools, you will see many variations on a keyword that have the same potential traffic and competition. The five-step process above will help you to select the best ones on a subjective basis that will drive the right search traffic to your page to achieve your marketing goal.

Learn about SEO services provided by our agency here.

By John Thyfault, Vice President, Search Engine and Social Media Marketing, Beasley Direct and Online Marketing

Summary
Five Steps to Arriving at the Best Keyword Mix - The Art of Keyword Selection for Search Engine Marketing
Article Name
Five Steps to Arriving at the Best Keyword Mix - The Art of Keyword Selection for Search Engine Marketing
Description
If you have ever thought of driving more traffic to your website from organic search, you are sure to have heard about how important it is to select the right keywords. There are many data driven tools, such as the AdWords Keyword Planner, Keyword Discovery and Spyfu, that can help you to identify keywords, understand the potential traffic and look at the relative competition that your site is facing to rank for these keywords. This process will often leave you with a large of a list of keywords from which to select.
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Beasley Direct and Online Marketing, Inc.
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